Thoughts on projection

0

Dear Artist,

This morning, Shaun Dziedzic of Zurich, Switzerland wrote, “I’ve been invited to paint some murals in an ancient abbey in Cyprus. I need to either paint them here and transport them there, or perhaps I might make smaller ones here and project and repaint them there. What do you think of this latter idea and what projecting equipment do you suggest, and, as I have a fairly limited budget, should I buy or rent?”

Thanks, Shaun. These days, digital projectors range from inexpensive ones with fuzzy, not-too-bright images of limited size to high-end models that can project huge, bright, non-keystoned images in sunny situations. My current choice is an Epson Powerlite Presenter. It has terrific brightness and size augmented by a zoom lens. Its best feature is that you don’t need to run it through a laptop. You just shove in a flash card or a disc and away you go. Others among us may be using even better machines that I’m not aware of.

If your job in Cyprus involves some clergy, they may be able to loan you one of their own. Priests project power points.

I’ve always noted, when I make a copy of former work, it never quite measures up to the first pass of the brush. Idea: Do the mural in a smaller size, get it digitally scanned, and make an enlarged giclee on mylar or canvas and take it to the abbey and glue it up. Pro-muralists are commonly using this method, particularly in outdoor or strongly-lit applications where fading is a factor. You own the disc — you and your heirs can keep making your mural to perfection for eternity.

Idea: Go to a second-hand equipment or camera shop and resurrect an old slide projector. Check to see if the bulb lights up, and check online if bulbs can still be bought. Shoot your work on 35mm slide film — there are still several brands being produced. If you can’t afford a digital projector, an old Kodak Carousel or other model is the most economical system. Excellent image too. If you’re thinking about an opaque projector, they tend to be the dim-bulbs of the projector world — pretty feeble in big-image applications.

Best regards,

Robert

PS: “What one has most to work and struggle for in painting is to do the work with a great amount of labour and sweat in such a way that it may afterward appear, however much it was laboured upon, to have been done almost quickly and almost without any labour, and very easily, although it was not.” (Michelangelo)

Esoterica: Another way of doing the job is to take over the abbey for a few years. A steady flow of onlookers will watch you up there on your skinny scaffold. They may even leave a few Euros in your modest pot. Idea: Don’t stand back to admire your work! Michelangelo drew his figure outlines on paper, traced them with a pounce wheel, pounced them with chalk or charcoal, retraced his lines with paint and went through three popes.

Authentic mural methodology
by James Gloria, Bangor, PA, USA

030811_james-gloria

mural on ceiling by James Gloria

I was a mural painter for 20 years, doing primarily interior work on new construction in water based media on a large scale. My training is as a Scenic Designer for theater, so I am used to working very large, having completed some murals up to 10×20 meters in dimension. I also have experience in true Fresco technique as well. My first impulse is that if the murals are for an ancient abbey, that they should be done in fresco directly on the walls. This would be the most authentic technique, and fit the aesthetics. If budget and time constraints are limited, then artists’ acrylic on the existing masonry would be the next best option. Acrylics will breathe and flex with the movement of the masonry. Mural painters who want further advice can contact me directly at this address.

Digital preparation
by Wayne Haag, Sydney, Australia

030811_wayne-haag

Untitled
oil painting by Wayne Haag

Another method is to draw the mural digitally and have it printed onto canvas, then glued up onto the wall and then he can paint directly onto it. This eliminates the need for projection which may be impossible due to distance from the wall, distortion of the projection etc. The digital drawing can be downsized for the painting of colour roughs as well. This method also allows the drawing, colour scheme and composition to be approved prior to final painting. When it is approved you simply print out the final size and glue it up onto the wall. Extending that idea he could also do a digital ‘under painting’ so as to lay in basic values and/or colours. An acrylic medium over the printed canvas to seal in the print and away you go!


There are 3 comments for Digital preparation by Wayne Haag

From: Cristina Monier — Mar 08, 2011

Loved your painting.

From: Cristina Monier — Mar 08, 2011

There is another widely used method, called marouflage, where the mural is painted usually in oil over a first quality canvass of the best linen and glued to the wall, it has some advantages but I think that all fresco is the most traditional and to date, the most durable, if you re not up to it, then the highest quality acryllic paint over a very well prepared wall is the next best think and drawing in strong paper which is pierced with a seamstress marker will allow you to transfer the desing on the wall and still make the necessary corrections.

From: Anonymous — Mar 08, 2011

One can buy an actual pounce wheel which is much better than the dress maker wheels I have seen. Pounce patterns work best I feel when made on 90lb kraft paper. One wants a very slightly soft or flexible substrate to be under the kraft paper so that when one runs the wheel over the paper the spurs penetrate the support under the paper just a little but not so much one cits all the way through…at least this has been my experience.

Advantages of working directly
by Liz King-Sangster, France

030811_liz-sangster

“Glass Vases”
oil painting by Liz Sangster

I would advise Shaun to dump the idea of projectors, to prepare the drawings beforehand and paint directly in situ, because then he has the margin of changing and tweaking the designs to suit the actual space. Light and wall texture can play havoc with preconceived designs. Walls are never perpendicular, there is never a straight floor for your horizontals, you have to rely on your eye to decide what is level and what is not.

The way I worked, and still work when painting murals, is to draw or paint the design to scale, 1:25 is best, square the artwork up into 2cm squares, then square up the wall (in chalk) into 50cm squares. Basically you need the wall to be divided in to the same number of squares horizontally and vertically as you have on your design. Then, with coloured chalk, pushed into an 80cm stick of thin bamboo, split lengthways at the top with a strong rubber band to hold it, draw directly on the wall. You would be surprised at how quickly you become accustomed to the scale. I always painted with a brush on a stick — you need to get as far from the work as you can. If Shaun is unused to big scale painting, then he should do a few trials on his walls at home (great for getting your own place decorated at the same time!) Check out the availability of paints in Cyprus; it may be better to take his own with him. However, if he uses local paints they may be better suited to the local climate.


There are 3 comments for Advantages of working directly by Liz King-Sangster

From: Anonymous — Mar 08, 2011

Exquisite painting!

From: Tatjana — Mar 08, 2011

I love your painting!

From: Dianne — Mar 08, 2011

Liz

Such a marvelous, yet primitive concept! I enjoy reading & hearing about how artists go about problem solving in order to get the job done.

Michelangelo’s learning curve
by William McCarthy, USA

030811_william-mccarthy

“Umbrian Fields”
original painting by William McCarthy

I was impressed with your comment by Michelangelo, after having read the book The Pope’s Ceiling, I have a correction for you. Michelangelo did start off with the cartoon and the pounce wheel, but after about a third of the work was done he abandoned that approach and painted directly onto the wet plaster. If you can get an image of the ceiling in its fullness you will see that it starts out very tight — lots of figures and detail, and by mid-ceiling it explodes into a more free form expression. Not only did Michelangelo hate painting, he hired assistants from Florence to scrape the existing mural off and teach him how to paint the fresco style. He had never done a fresco until that ceiling. Oh, yes, he hired assistants from Florence because he didn’t trust the ones available in Rome.

UV coatings for inkjet murals
by Mark D. Gottsegen, Greensboro, NC, USA

Robert, your idea is good, but there are complicated consequences. Inkjet inks are highly vulnerable to outdoor exposures, especially direct sunlight. Even the best inks can still use colorants that are not very good, no matter what the manufacturer of the ink or the printer says. There are UV filtering coatings that can be put onto the installed murals, or applied after printing, while the print is still in the studio. The coatings have to be renewed every ten years or so, depending on the quality of the coating material and its contents.

Getting professional information
by Sharon Knettell, Woonsocket, RI, USA

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“The Age of Mallory”
oil painting by Sharon Knettell

Digital giclees — absolutely not! You can get more accurate data from the National Gallery in Washington DC where they have an extensive restoration department. Also, the canvas or paper it is printed on might not stand up. The canvasses used are generally inferior.

You should check the condition and makeup of the wall and learn something about professional mural applications. You cannot just slap up whatever you want. The charm of these old places depends on the handwork. If you could not afford to do the job properly for the amount of money, you should have turned it down. On the other hand you would be a part of history if you could manage it beautifully and do it with all your heart.

You could try what the original method was — creating a squared-off drawing enlargement from your cartoon or modello. Get a pattern tracer to create holes and pounce some charcoal or pastel dust. You can then copy your cartoon in whatever your method is.

Here is a PDF of Raphael’s cartoons for the Sistine Chapel. You can see the gridded-off lines.

The small cartoon can be your keepsake as some are very valuable.

A mural adventure
by Bill McEnroe, Tumwater, WA, USA

030811_bill-mcenroe

“View Through A Window”
pastel painting by Bill McEnroe

When I was in the US Navy in San Francisco, waiting the commissioning of the troop transport, USS Rodman, I took liberty every night — I talked the owner of the “Cable Car Café” on the waterfront, at the roundabout of one of the cable car lines, into letting me do murals on the walls of the bar and restaurant. I’d made friends with a skilled artist, also waiting to be shipped out, and together we jerry-rigged scaffolds of 12″ planks about seven feet above the floor. We invented scenes of SF as we went along, as it might have looked in the Roaring 1850’s, crowded with men and women wearing clothes of that period, Paper Boys hawking their wares, Horses and Buggies, Classy Molls — the works — first lining all in black, then filling in (sparsely) with oil paint. We worked after 5 pm, three nights a week for about a month, hurrying before being shipped out. Of course, this drama attracted huge crowds of kibitzers, many of whom would, “Send the artists up a drink,” so we had to really be careful teetering on those narrow planks. I`ve forgotten how much we were paid — not much as I recall — but it was fun and I learned a lot. After the war, my brother took black and white 35mm pictures of the murals, but soon after, the Cable Car Café was razed for another building — and of course I can’t find those pictures. Tell Mr. Dziedzic to build sturdy scaffolds.


There are 4 comments for A mural adventure by Bill McEnroe

From: Mishcka — Mar 08, 2011

Great painting. I went through your website. Excellent!

From: Sharon Cory — Mar 08, 2011

Great story! An artist is an artist no matter what else they’re doing.

Love the work on your website. Brilliant.

From: P. Y. Duthie — Mar 08, 2011

It made my day to see your pastel paintings on the website, Bill!

From: Maryellen — Mar 10, 2011

Your work is exquisite, Bill.

Artograph Projector
by Deb Marvin, Worcester, MA, USA

030811_deb-marvin

“Julian”
pencil drawing by Deb Marvin

I recently purchased a digital projector made specifically for artists — a new product from Art-O-Graph. I haven’t tried anything as large as a mural but I really like the quality of what I am getting when transferring sketches to paper and canvas.

Product description:

“This revolutionary new projector from Artograph eliminates the need for printed photos and sheets of paper: now you can instantly project digital images from virtually any source, including digital cameras, computers, SD cards, and smartphones. Sturdy construction and maintenance-free LED lamps, combined with customizable image controls and layout grids make for a fantastic projector perfect for any artist or muralist.”

I have only had the projector a couple of weeks but compared to the prices of Epson and others, this projector was very reasonably priced. I purchased mine from ASW for $599.99. It is small, too, which surprised me, and comes with a carrying case. I am going to keep playing around with it to see what else it can be used for. It is also a useful tool when showing my portfolio of work to someone.


There is 1 comment for Artograph Projector by Deb Marvin

From: valerie norberry vanorden — Mar 20, 2013

I’ve had an Artograph projector for about 15 years and it sits on the side and collects dust. I do use it to center windows in a project when I do a house portrait; however, I find it very hard to draw any kind of detail with it. Maybe due to my small apt. and lack of large wall-space. So I only use it to figure proportions, if I use it at all. Mine was $100.00 back in the 80’s. I won 200.00 from United Way for donating, so I bought a nice set of colored pencils and the Agfa projector with the money.

Tricks of the projecting artist
by Charles Peck, Punta Gorda, Florida, USA

030811_charles-peck

“Second Stage Of New Work”
acrylic painting by Charles Peck

Through the ’70s to ’90s I was an independent vendor doing some illustrated billboards on the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Texas, as well as other projects that were presented. Now I make most of my sustenance money from public and some private murals. There was a time I used a 1000 watt projector but that “keystoning” you refer to in your letter was/is a big problem plus there were many situations when it just had to be drawn from either too much size or brightness. So I learned that copying creates a slavish looking image at least in my mind and since I keep getting calls apparently some other folks enjoy the enhanced expressive capacity of just drawing and painting the darn image. There is a process I feel is most important that is not present when I used projection anyway. That is my getting more deeply connected empathetically with the work and getting my noggin to more fully wrap itself around the image in what I guess is an intuitive way … my being able to more correctly sense when something was off while up close and personal. I have used many pounce patterns in old days before computers came to destroy the sign art trade. I like the energy contained in a sketch and find that the closer I am to the first time through with a piece the more it speaks. So many decades ago, I gave away that old projector and now I just grid and “loft” the small work or its reference parts with that old trusty tri-scale ruler. I am doing one now that is 33 by 58 feet from an 18 by 24 inch painting and my trusty Staedtler-Mars Architect ruler. One of the main joys is to be up there on the scaffold really painting and not just doing some laborious copying or being just another “soft tissue pantograph.” In fact I need to go get on that wall this morning so thanks for your letter — it’s focusing my energy this fine a.m.

And also, a great little helper while way up there is the modern DSLR since it takes a picture and lets you look at it small without having to climb down and take a look see. It still pays off to climb down every now and then but the digital camera saves a lot of climbing and shows stuff that is wrong rather easily.


There are 2 comments for Tricks of the projecting artist by Charles Peck

From: Betty Newcomer — Mar 08, 2011

I do not paint murals, however I do my own sketches in charcoal, or whatever before painting, because so many people say “I feel connected to the work”, and so do I! A large part of me and who I am, is in the preliminary work, my feelings, and I learn a lot about the subject. I can spot a projected drawing a mile off! ugh. Anyone can do that!

From: Mary Aslin — Mar 08, 2011

I painted a very large backdrop for the snow scene in the Nutcracker for the St. Croix Academy for the Arts. I had never done something this large before.

After doing some research on paints and materials and producing a small study, I went to work on the large piece (18×40 feet) on the floor of a video store that had gone out of business. I was nervous about it but just had to blast ahead as rehearsals would start in one week. After painting a midtone I gridded out a general arrangement and sketched some general outlines in chalk and then went to work. I reminded myself that the paint was opaque and that I could correct mistakes. Since while painting I couldn’t step back and see if the forms were developing properly, I had to work very intuitively. Then, I got up on a ladder and looked at the painting with binoculars turned backwards to get a distant view. It worked very well! Of course, when it was time to hang the backdrop, I was nervous that the scene would have some unnatural angles, but that wasn’t the case. Thirteen years later, the school still uses the backdrop. It was a great experience and it taught me that you just have to dive in.

And the painting experience, while referenced against the study, stands alone….intuition and joyful strokes in the moment belong to that piece uniquely. In other words, there is only so much planning and gridding you can and should do.

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That includes Stan Leavitt of Hilton Head Island, SC, USA, who wrote, “Be sure that what you buy is compatible with the voltage where you are going to work.”

And also Tom Andrich of Winnipeg, MB, Canada, who wrote, “You forgot to suggest an overhead projector — cheapest and very easy.”

Archived Comments

Enjoy the past comments below for Thoughts on projection

 

 

From: Malcolm Lowe — Mar 03, 2011

“Priests project power points”

Alliteration worthy of inclusion in a sermon …….

Regards

Malcolm

From: Debbie Viola — Mar 03, 2011

Any projector I tried in the $200 range was terrible for projecting further than 5 feet back. And the room had to be pitch black. I will invest in a good one when I get my next big mural commission. In the meantime, I grid out my drawing, and then draw the grid on the wall, and paint, square by square. Good luck with your project.

From: Eric — Mar 04, 2011

Instead of taking slides with a conventional camera, I’d recommend taking digital photos and having them made into slides. There are online services that can do this for you. You might even have a camera shop in your area that can do it. The advantage is obvious: You know in advance which photos will make the best slides, and you can crop the photo on your computer to take best advantage of the available space on the slide. When you shoot regular film, you have no idea how it will turn out until it’s back from the developer.

The other advantage of digital photo files that you convert to slides is that you can make grayscale photos to detect how well your values play against each other. In some photoediting programs you can also convert your photo to a line drawing, which might make scaling the picture a bit easier and allow for quick work in laying in your lines for a large drawing.

Debbie is correct about the need for darkness when using most opaque projectors, but I’ve seen some (Artograph, for example) that can project quite a distance with great clarity if you use a crisply defined image as your source. Electronic projectors overcome the need for darkness to a great extent, though I have no idea how well they work in brightly lit areas. I guess the same applies to conventional 35mm slide projectors.

Good luck to you.

From: Susan Furze — Mar 04, 2011

Shaun, I presume you’ll be on the Greek part of Cyprus – if you need electrical equipment, it will be equivalent to the British system so you may need adapters for Swiss gadgets. All electrical goods are imported into Cyprus and are expensive. I would make sure that rental is available before you get there, since I doubt it for your specific requirements. Most priests are very poor in Cyprus, especially in Abbeys and I would doubt that they would have the equipment you need so check it out before you go. You may want to google some Cypriot artists and see if they could help you with your needs. Good luck. Susan Furze

From: charles peck (.com) — Mar 04, 2011

Morning Robert, this is a subject I spend and have spent a lot of time with. Through the 70’s to 90’s I was an independent vendor doing some illustrated billboards on the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Texas as well as other projects as they presented their self. Now I make most of my sustenance money from public and some private murals. There was a time I used a 1000 watt projector early on but that “keystoning” you refer to in your letter was/is a big problem plus there were many situations when it just had to be drawn from either too much size or brightness. So I learned that copying creates a slavish looking image at least in my mind and since I keep getting calls apparently some other folks enjoy the enhanced expressive capacity of just drawing and painting the darn image. There is a process I feel is most important that is not present when I used projection anyway. That is my getting more deeply connected empathetically with the work and getting my noggin to more fully wrap itself around the image in what I guess is an intuitive way … my being able to more correctly sense when something was off while up close and personal. I have used many pounce patterns in old days before computers came to destroy the sign art trade but see their usefulness just in making reproductions of the same image no matter what Old Mike did. I like the energy contained in a sketch and find that the closer I am to the first time through with a piece the more it speaks (for me at least). So many decades ago I gave away that old projector and now I just grid and “loft” the small work or its reference parts with that old trusty tri-scale ruler. I am doing one now that is 33ft by 58ft from an 18 by 24 inch painting and my trusty Staedtler-Mars Architect ruler. One of the main joys is to be up there on the scaffold really painting and not just doing some laborious copying or being just another “soft tissue pantograph”. In fact I need to go get on that wall this morning so thanks for your letter and its focusing my energy’s this fine am.

oh yeah forgot to mention that a great little helper while way up there is the modern DSLR since it takes a picture and lets you look at it small without having to climb down and take a look see. It still pays off to climb down every now and then but the digital camera saves a lot of climbing and shows stuff that is wrong rather easily.

From: Dirk — Mar 04, 2011

I have done one mural.

I painted to scale (2×4′), followed by a high resolution digital scan.

A local printer made four panels, which overlapped slightly.

I was surprised at the quality: no dots on a finished product that measures 8×16 feet. Biased as I may be, I found it beautiful.

Costs are much less than painting 8×16 feet at $1 per square inch.

From: Lee Aubel — Mar 04, 2011

If you need a brighter image on a modest budget try using two projectors. The images may not match perfectly across the entire image but by keeping the projectors as close to each other as possible and carefully matching images in your work area you can double image brightness and gain a level of redundancy without trashing your budget. Note that if the optics are fairly close you should be okay even with different projector brands – and always carry at least one more copy of the image than you could possibly need! Good Luck

From: Kevin Fortin — Mar 04, 2011

Is this a joke? Maybe plain walls with a fresh coat of paint would be a better idea.

From: Malcolm Lowe — Mar 04, 2011

“Priests project power points”

Alliteration worthy of inclusion in a sermon.

From: Phil Kendall — Mar 04, 2011

I have seen how the Greeks do it. And have talked with the artists, here’s a summary:

An art studio based in Athens does this on a professional basis. A survey is made, paper templates are cut. [lots of scaffolding involved]walls, domes, barreled ceilings etc. They take them back to the studio. They cut out the shapes on fine canvas, make the paintings AND go back and stick them in place. Make the touch-ups to cover the joints etc. Finishing with a coat of varnish.

From: Jim Lorriman — Mar 04, 2011
From: Bonny Current — Mar 04, 2011

I read the title and was thinking in an entirely different vein – that is, artists who project an image, say a photograph, and then draw it out on their surface. I know some people who do this and I have very mixed but mostly negative feelings about this. I feel it is cheating the public and misrepresenting their talent – even though they “paint it in” themselves.

From: Leigh Cassidy — Mar 04, 2011
From: Lynda Pogue — Mar 04, 2011

The simplest way is to copy the image onto acetate and use an overhead projector.

From: Joyce Cameron — Mar 04, 2011

I was wondering about the slide projectors. Would the electrical current be different in Cyprus, even the fittings on bulbs seem to vary from country to country.

From: sittingbytheriver — Mar 04, 2011

You are planning to paint murals in an ancient abbey. Does anyone besides me feel horrified by this idea? Ancient abbeys should be preserved as is. Do not paint on the walls. Period.

From: charles peck (.com) — Mar 04, 2011

oh yeah Robert, this mural will be getting me my premier membership to your site…finally. Things have been tight since the wild and heavy hurricanes of 04 and then this depression but things are cooking just fine right now. Been waiting to get on your list for several years…only two weeks to go now. ;-]

why not do an article on good mural paints for outdoors with the UV coatings needed? Two I use are Mann Brothers and Modern Masters Theme paint (my fav right now).

From: gail caduff-nash — Mar 04, 2011

i haven’t read the comments, but, like ‘sittingbytheriver’ i’m fairly anxious at the thought of you painting directly onto “ancient abbey” walls. as a former house painter, i know that painting directly onto any wall is a serious commitment – that if you will read the bio of John Singer Sargeant you will see may just blow up in your face. MUCH better to do the work separately and bring it there. they can always frame it out to make it part of the wall. and GOOD LUCK!

From: charles peck (.com) — Mar 05, 2011

after reading these comments and re-reading the letter it dawns on me no mention was made of surface preparation. I assumed (several others may have as well) that it would be taken care of professionally but now see that may not be the case. It is important to deal with the existing wall conditions first before doing anything else. Not knowing what the situation is makes it impossible to be more direct in suggestions other than to say it must be treated in a way to allow the paint to stick. This may lead one to advise using the method of applying a previously painted substrate to the walls. I prefer actually painting on the walls but not in every situation. It would have the side benefit of preserving the ancient walls in their found condition.

From: Wayne Haag — Mar 07, 2011

Firstly.. is it inside or outside? And secondly, the nature of such a historical building would or SHOULD preclude ANY painting on walls. If a false wall can be erected a few inches off the actual wall, you can paint or glue a giclee on that. Exactly what happened with the mural I created for the Historic Houses Trust here in Sydney. No way was anything going to be permanently affixed to the wall!

From: freda alschuler www.fredaArt.ch — Mar 08, 2011

I was just recently in a prestidious art show which included a collection of Dali’s lithographs and some originals, I suspect Dali was used as bait. We were a group of 30 artists of a higher standard if I may say so. One artist had digitaly projected paintings of original photographs from well known oldie filmstars eg M. Monroe, which were hand touched up as one sees now and again. At the end of the week a prize was given to peoples(visitors choice) He got 2nd prize! Well, here it shows what the general public feels comfortable with! I am disapointed as all the ORIGINALITY from the other artists were not truely appreciated

From: Elena — Mar 08, 2011

Had to smile at the couple of comments that one should not paint on the ancient walls. Europe is all ancient and our time plays a part as important as any other. If nobody painted on ancient walls we wouldn’t have much of the art that we have. our time is as important as ancient past. That’s the way we think here…

From: Michael — Mar 08, 2011

‘Just keep going — no feeling is final’.

Lovely, and just what I needed to hear!

From: Shaun Dziedzic — Mar 08, 2011

I just want to thank everybody who took the time to respond. It was very interesting to read through all the messages, although the project was misunderstood. I am not working directly on the wall of this wonderful building so my problems are of another sort, but a couple of people wrote about projectors they have used and how they used them and I got some ideas there.

From: Cynthia Wick — Mar 08, 2011

I can’t find a good projector that is clear and bright to project my photographs on canvas to paint. I currently don’t use a projector when working from my pictures but there are times if an image is complicated I’d like to land some reference points. I’ve bought two that really are inadequate. Help!

From: Liz Reday — Mar 10, 2011

I’m all for projecting drawings or smaller studies up to make a larger sized work, but even using scaling up by hand, the larger work often suffers with a rigid and soulless look until I depart from my original study. Projecting photographs may look cool for beginning artists, but after looking at art for years and years, it is very obvious when a painting has been done from a projected photo. The average unsophisticated person might think it’s really cool that a painting looks “just like a photograph”, but how many of these folks plonk down more than $40. — for that painting? Believe me, art collectors, museums and most art galleries know one when they see them. As artists, we strive to express our inner souls, and the most direct way usually reaches others emotionally also, from upscale art collectors to the man in the street.

From: valerie norberry vanorden — Apr 02, 2013

I did one mural with a grid that I made from stacking milk crates (she just happened to have about 7 in her basement) against the wall and tracing around them, then “lifting” or re-sketching the sketch that was on non-repro blue gridded tracing paper. It turned out great!

 

 

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